The Last Chance Saloon…

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Then… and NOW…(upto 2014)

The big decline in the precious metals prices from 2011 to today, punctuated by a sharp reversal beginning in early 2016, appears to already be undergoing a final exhaustive bout of selling. The big decline remains to be the most important development for gold and silver investors. Why? Because this decline’s end is likely to present the ultimate buying opportunity for precious metals and for PM mining stocks over the next decade.

Before elaborating on this all-important issue, let’s briefly discuss the current events. The USD Index has rallied as it moved higher recently, due in large part to Fed jabbering about rate hikes, and the final 0.25% rise recently, after Gold reached its March 2016 interim high, with further talk of 3 more rate hikes in 2017, this dampened enthusiasm in the paper markets ensuring those with derivatives on their side could short the metals and thus drive down the price to interim lows, but the New Year will probably reverse that, as the festive season ends.

I’ve previously said that it was possible that we would see something like that in the short term. That’s exactly what happened – metals and miners moved a little lower especially in recent weeks. BUT, just before Xmas is when people are buying gifts for friends and family, not thinking about their portfolios, so markets quite often, soften at this time of year. So, for the brave, a VERY good time to buy metals and/or stocks (as I did today) in those companies with good assets, strong management and good fundamentals, with a longer term strategy for improvement in what should be a rising market for PMs – especially as the Trump win, will probably mean rising inflation for that nation in the medium term – if he keeps his promises.

Those companies who report in British Pounds, will also have a major boost to their bottom line, as profits reported in pounds sterling will reflect the recent decline in the pound’s value versus the dollar, in which many commodities are priced on international markets.

I’ve discussed the final bottom target for gold in previous posts, at circa 50% of the most recent high ($1925 – in 2011) – Here we discuss WHEN gold is likely to bottom.

Today’s price of $1129.85 is not quite at the lowest point – that was $1065 in the middle of 2015, but this pull back from the $1320 area of a few months ago, serves to mark what could be the nadir of a cup and handle formation on the Gold Chart, though it might more likely resemble a shallow bowl, as this decline extends for another year of the secular bear, in a longer term Bull market.

What may seem odd, on a quite different chart – is the one I’ve posted several times since the start of this blog, featuring the comparison of the last two decades with the late 1960s to 1981.

Why? Because, in a globalized economy with interconnected financial markets, no asset can move totally independently from other ones – and this is especially the case with gold and the Dollar. In most cases when the USD plunges a lot, gold is likely to rally a lot and when the USD soars, gold is likely to decline substantially. That’s likely to change in the final stage of the precious metals bull market, but it doesn’t seem we are quite at that point yet.

Therefore, the million-dollar question can be asked differently: when is the USD Index likely to form a very important top in the near term?

In my opinion, it’s most likely to happen in late January or early February 2017, with the second half of January being the most probable target. Trump’s Presidency begins at the peak of a long bull market in DOW stocks, due to Fed Funds Rates being as low as they are, with ESF (Exchange Stabilization fund) intervention and interest rate rises, which will begin to affect costs of doing business, in America, which will add to those corporation’s costs, yet do little to stimulate consumer spending which features so large in the overall picture in the U.S..

Let’s start with the discovery. What was the key thing that happened in the USD Index in the past few years? It rallied sharply and broke the all-important 100 level, or rather – it tried to – break above it, but failed and declined substantially. There were other attempts and they failed as well and were followed by an even bigger decline.

Since history rhymes, the big question is: “When did we see something similar?” Almost 20 years ago – in 1997. That’s the only time in the past 20+ years, when the weekly RSI was well over 80 (besides late 2014 and early 2015). This fact alone is something that should get your curiosity, but the big number of other similarities and how precise the key one is, should get your attention.

After the USD Index initially moved above 100 in August 1997, it declined sharply and it took several months before the next rally begun. The rally started after the USD moved to the 50-week moving average. That’s exactly what we saw in the more recent past – in 2015. What happened next in 1998? The USD tried moving above 100 a few more times, but finally declined substantially and this time the decline took the USD to a new low. Again, the same thing happened in 2015 and 2016. The shape of the rallies and declines was not identical, but it’s nothing to call home about – after all, very different events accompanied both time frames.

Up to this moment, the above analogy can be viewed as interesting, but perhaps not particularly important. What changes everything is an additional analogy – the size (in terms of both the price and extent) and shape of the 1975 – 1977 Gold price decline. The entire price trend, from 1968-1975, you would be able to guess by looking at the chart above, is eerily similar, to the period from 2000 to 2016, just merely extended over a few more years in these latest charts. Of course, the moves are not 100% identical, but are so close that we can view them as such.

In light of such significant similarity, we simply can’t ignore the likelihood that what followed the previous USD bottoms are going to follow these as well – especially as, so far this similarity is playing out near-perfectly.

Plotting the 1998 – 1999 rally on the current situation provides us with approximately 104 as the USD next target, but let’s focus on something different. How is the USD Index moving after the bottom?

Back in late 1998, the USD Index moved sharply higher, above the trend line and topped close to 97. Then it declined below 94, but the key thing is that it declined below the target line by approximately as much as it had previously rallied above it (in other words, the trend line continued to rally through the middle of the short-term decline). The bottom was formed more or less at the rising support line based on the previous important bottoms.

What happened earlier this year? Pretty much the same thing – the USD Index moved sharply above the rising trend line (the exact copy of the line from 1998 – 1999), then it declined below it by approximately as much as it had rallied above it previously, and bottomed. The bottom was formed more or less at the rising support line based on the previous important bottoms. The similarities are indeed extraordinary and the implications are very important. As far as the shape of the upcoming rally (the way the USD gets to its target) is concerned, we don’t have to see identical performance, just as the way in which the USD tried to move above 100 in 1998 wasn’t very similar to the way it tried to move above the same level in late 2015 and early 2016.

Still, the rally is very likely to end in a similar way to what we saw back in 1999 in terms of length and the size of the rally. So, when and how high is the USD Index likely to move? At the first sight we see that the target is at approximately the 104 level.

As far as time and the WHEN question is concerned, we saw the bottom in the dollar on May 3, 2016.

In technical analysis terms too there’s a big indicator. It’s the target based on the big reverse head-and-shoulders formation that started to form in late 2015 and was completed just a few days ago.

The size of the “head” in the head-and-shoulders and reverse-head-and-shoulders patterns is the size of the rally that’s likely to follow. We already saw the breakout (at about 96) so we can use this technique. We mark the size of the “head” and the target based on it. As discussed, this technique points to 104 as the next major target.

Given the likelihood that we’ll see a big rally in the USD Index in the coming weeks, there is a very good possibility that we’ll see gold at new lows. It seems that we still have time to prepare for the ultimate buying opportunity in gold, silver and mining stocks, but this time is rapidly running out. New Year’s Eve may be your last best chance.

So, will gold continue to plunge if the USD continues to rally, like it did in 1999 – 2001? Not necessarily. If could very well be the case that prolonged strength in the USD Index will not really be due to the inherent strength of the USD (or the U.S. economy), but due to weakness in the Euro (if the latter continues to exist, that is) and in other major currencies. George Soros, has reported that Brexit may cause the break-up of the Euro-area, and I have a sneaking suspicion, on this (as on many other things) he maybe right.

If this is the case, gold is likely to rally due to the demand from these other country’s Central Banks and investors fleeing the Euro. Consequently, the discussed analogy has important implications for the next few years.

The USD Index could continue to rally, but not necessarily due to the demand for dollars, but the lack of demand for other currencies. Especially if the EU implodes, then all bets are off.

One other thing that happened in recent weeks, was the events in India, where the Premier Modhi, used vague worries about the Black Market and Terrorism to attack both the currency markets, and the Gold markets simultaneously,… The abolishment of the 1,000 and 500 Rupee notes, and the slap down of the Gold markets were a sign that those behind the financial systems are terrified, that we the people will not give the government their taxes to pay down the debt, and these banksters might actually need to work for a living instead… (he said cynically)

Summing up, while the short-term indications for the precious metals sector remain range bound, the medium-term trend remains bullish and it seems that the final bottom will be formed in the first months of 2017, with the second half of January 2017 being the most probable time frame.

Meanwhile, it seems that any potential profits on my long positions will stagnate further before this trade is over and the up-trend resumes.

Here’s how we got here…

And, here, we hear how it will play out from one of the world’s best investors…

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After posting this, I came across this item in King World News web-site, that draws a similar comparison, to the one, I spotted some several years ago…

http://kingworldnews.com/worried-action-gold-silver-just-read/

In it we see the image below…Note: The image uses a logarithmic scale on the left, not Gold price… And suggests the 8-fold price rise we saw last time, from trough to peak, will be less than the next mania phase… We might conclude that it might be 10 x the low price of last year, taking the Gold price to circa $10,000… Remember where you heard it first…

kwn-goldpricecomparison1970-2000-20161021-1024x665

And Alex Jones is in sparkling form, as usual…

W.

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